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Tag-Archive for "statistics"

Now listen carefully, 007… Oct 05

Is liking Die Another Day a controversial view?

That question came on up on Twitter this morning so I thought I’d find out pseudo-scientifically. I’ve looked at the Internet Movie Database‘s rating for each film and here’s what the people scoring them say:

Graph of Bond scores - raw date in table

2006′s Casino Royale is the clear winner, and there are a few other interesting notes: there’s a clear early peak at Goldfinger – very much received wisdom – but that’s also the most watched (if we count ratings as viewers) of the early films. OHMSS has less attention paid to it than any of the other official Bond movies.

But what of Die Another Day? It hits a relatively poor 6.0, which you can see more clearly in context from the full data, ordering by score:

Year Film Rating Raters
2006 Casino Royale 7.9 253817
1964 Goldfinger 7.8 77120
1963 From Russia with Love 7.5 47393
1962 Dr. No 7.3 61548
1995 GoldenEye 7.2 114333
1977 The Spy Who Loved Me 7.1 41204
1965 Thunderball 7.0 44021
1967 You Only Live Twice 6.9 40873
1969 On Her Majesty’s Secret Service 6.8 32162
1973 Live and Let Die 6.8 40291
1981 For Your Eyes Only 6.8 39364
2008 Quantum of Solace 6.8 163854
1971 Diamonds are Forever 6.7 41574
1974 The Man with the Golden Gun 6.7 38891
1987 The Living Daylights 6.7 38634
1983 Octopussy 6.6 40163
1989 Licence to Kill 6.5 41075
1997 Tomorrow Never Dies 6.4 82866
1999 The World is Not Enough 6.3 93250
1979 Moonraker 6.2 39503
1985 A View to a Kill 6.2 38112
1983 Never Say Never Again 6.1 30605
2002 Die Another Day 6.0 101478
1967 Casino Royale 5.2 15322

 
So Die Another Day is easily the least popular of the official canon, even pipped by rotten Thunderball remake Never Say Never Again, and only saved from the ignominy of last place by the presence of the weird 60s version of the movie that’s top of the list.

6.0 isn’t, in the scheme of things, a terrible score, so plenty of people must like the film. Nevertheless, from a Bond fan perspective, yes – going out to bat for Die Another Day is a little bit controversial.

Which isn’t very surprising because it is rubbish.

The Saturday List: Menky Stat Check (6) Apr 10

Tuesday was this blog’s sixth anniversary and so the one day of the year I talk blog stats. But it was also the day the General Election was called, so I’ve been a bit busy this week. I’ve therefore merged this weekend’s list with the annual number round-up.

So here we go. The previous five years’ figures are in brackets, last year’s first.

  • 3 (3, 2, 2, 2, 2): number of servers this site has been hosted on
  • 2 (2, 2, 2, 2, 2): number of blogging applications used
  • 1,157 (1,123, 977, 873, 588, 226): total number of posts
  • 1,742 (1,614, 1,518, 1,350, 774, 444): total number of comments
  • 1.51 (1.44, 1.55, 1.55, 1.32, 1.96): average number of comments per post
  • 137,317 (112,651, 70,993, 43,016, 6,322): total unique hits

Top seven referring websites (excluding search engines):

(With two new entries there, the sites that dropped from the chart were Lib Dem Voice and Wikipedia – last year’s number one referrer.)

Top nine referring blogs:

(I should point out that those Derren Brown referrals came from someone in his comments, not the scary brain man himself.)

Top ten search terms:

  • 10 (-): “derren brown” lottery
  • 9 (-): hut 33
  • 8 (-): barry letters
  • 7 (-): derren brown lottery how
  • 6 (-): eurovision 2009 island
  • 5 (-): top 10 iphone apps
  • 4 (-): darren brown lottery
  • 3 (-): derren brown lottery prediction
  • 2 (1): eurovision 2009
  • 1 (-): derren brown lottery

Turns out that lottery song brought in much of the last year’s traffic. Other choice searches from the top 30 include toby stephens (finally out of the top 10); freebmd; karaoke circus; and colin jeavons.

I’ll try to be on time next year.

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Menky stat check (5) Apr 06

The dawning of the new financial year indicates that a much more important occasion is upon us: today, this blog is five years old. As has been the tradition over the last half-decade, this is the one day I do blog stats. So here they are. (Yikes – I see I used almost exactly the same introduction last year).

Previous three years’ figures are in brackets, last year’s first.

  • 3 (2, 2, 2, 2): number of servers this site has been hosted on
  • 2 (2, 2, 2, 2): number of blogging applications used
  • 1,123 (977, 873, 588, 226): total number of posts
  • 1,614 (1,518, 1,350, 774, 444): total number of comments
  • 1.44 (1.55, 1.55, 1.32, 1.96): average number of comments per post
  • 112,651 (70,993, 43,016, 6,322): total unique hits (counting since May 2004 – now switched to Google Analytics, which counted 6,000 fewer this last year than my old hit counter)

Top seven referring websites (excluding search engines):

Top nine referring blogs:

Top ten search terms:

  • 10 (-): baroness ashton
  • 9 (-): matt smith dr who
  • 8 (-): england census 1911
  • 7 (-): new doctor who announced
  • 6 (6): toby stephens
    (He just won’t go away. This is why. *shrug*)
  • 5 (-): matt smith doctor who
  • 4 (-): new doctor who
  • 3 (-): geoffrey perkins
  • 2 (1): clocks go forward
    (Knocked off the top spot by – as you may have guessed by now…)
  • 1 (-): matt smith

Despite an otherwise fairly quiet year, this blog’s biggest day of traffic ever followed the announcement that TV’s Matt Smith would succeed TV’s David Tennant and TV’s Doctor Who, largely powered by some surprisingly high Google rankings, reflecting how little had been written about the new Doctor in the past.

Same time next year then?

Category: Blogging, Doctor Who  | Tags:  | 2 Comments
Pounds, pence and the Palace Jun 28

Buckingham Palace is quite canny about the way it releases its royal spending figures. The BBC reports today:

The Queen and the Royal Family cost the UK taxpayer £37.4m in the last financial year, her financial public accounts reveal. The cost, equivalent to 62p per person in the UK, rose 4.2% over the previous year, accountants said.

By doing the “How much do they cost each person?” calculation (and that’s every man, woman and child, not every taxpayer), the cost seems very reasonable.

And yet the story seems to come across differently when we hear about MPs’ expenses – £80.8m in 2004-5 is the best figure I can find – when it’s made out to be a huge sum (and, of course, for most of us it is). Compare it with the Royal Family figure, though, and bear in mind that it’s paying for over six hundred of the blighters. Perhaps Parliament should adopt the Royals’ cost per person calculation: using the same population basis, it indicates that £1.33 from each person in this country funds MPs’ salaries and allowances. Suddenly it doesn’t seem to much – perhaps only proving you can do anything with statistics…

Category: Politics  | Tags: , ,  | 2 Comments